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If you want to write a novel that’s literary as fuck

Then here are some tips from the fucking great Suzanne Reisman. 6. Why’d That Asshole Do That, Part II A novel that’s literary as fuck needs some baseline plot, even if your character development is fucking amazing and you don’t believe in pedestrian bullshit, like plots. People appreciate a little fucking action. That is why even readers of books who are literary as fuck flock to superhero movies that have almost no character development at all....

 · Laura Lis Scott
Still from Valerian

On Valerian

This post contains spoilers. It also will come off as negative to the point of sounding harsh. Apologies. I generally don’t like to post negative reviews. What’s the point? So let me say right off that I did not hate Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets. But the movie does not really work. As a writer, I want to understand why. Luc Besson’s science fiction I’ve been a fan of Luc Besson’s movies since the 1980s, when I first saw his first feature....

 · Laura Lis Scott
blue and gold swirls over a town at night

Something I often have to remind myself as a writer

On Quora, someone posted the question: Why am I so intimidated by a blank page staring up at me in my sketch book? Why is it so hard for me to just dive in? My answer goes way back to something I learned getting my MFA, and basically it comes down to this: A book (or short story or painting or movie or any creative work) comes to life and dies several times over....

 · Laura Lis Scott
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A firstperson narration aspect often overlooked

The story and the telling of the story are two different things. In other words, the narrator and the character in the story are not necessarily the same person. Oh, they have the same name and all that. But the narrator knows the story she is telling, while the character within the story does not. This provides opportunities that few writers explore. I’ll use an old classic movie as an example of what I’m talking about....

 · Laura Lis Scott
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How is the author-editor relationship affected by who hires whom?

That’s a question I explore in a guest blogpost over on Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers.

 · Laura Lis Scott
Cold Blood book cover

Who is the woman hero?

This is a question our culture seems to be still trying to figure out. Yesterday Kate Lawrence explored this question in a blog post about her books’ main character, Yamabuki, a historical woman samurai in 12th-century Japan.

 · Laura Lis Scott
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Entering creative space (Morning Check-Up for Artists)

Time to close the browser.

 · Laura Lis Scott
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J is for Jot

If you have nothing to say, jot it down. If you have something to say, jot it down. Just jot it down, and sort it out later.

 · Laura Lis Scott
golden comedy-tragedy masks

Writing lessons from the (Acting) Method

When we write, we’re sharing a piece of ourselves, as transformed through our novel or short story memoir or even non-fiction book. Often it can get emotional, and that’s not always an easy place to get to. Our performance on paper (or in the word processor—you know what I mean) requires us to be ready to get to that place, mentally, emotionally. And in this, what we do on paper is not unlike what actors do on stage and in film....

 · Laura Lis Scott
lightning in the night sky with the words OUCH!!

Stephen Fry takes on language pedantry

I confess, I love language. I love grammar. I enjoy well-written prose that demonstrates creative elegance while still conforming to the rules. Even so, Stephen Fry truly nails it here in a rebuttal to people who are far worse than I am (I think). via Hillary Kelly, The New Republic

 · Laura Lis Scott