Dark version of multilingual eye examination chart

Beautiful multilingual eye examination chart of the early 1900s San Francisco

112 years ago, optometry was a growing profession. In diverse cities like San Francisco, however, the eye chart commonplace in western countries today could not suffice. Enter George Mayerle’s multilingual eye examination chart. George Mayerle’s Vision Test Chart (ca. 1907). Via Public Domain Review Public Domain Review writes: The chart was a culmination of his many years of practice and, according to Mayerle, its distinctive international angle served also to reflect the diversity and immigration which lay at the heart of the city in which he worked....

 · Laura Lis Scott
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Rediscovering Notes app (and it scans, it scans!)

How do you take notes? I prefer to use my bullet journal. But what about when I don’t have it handy? When I’m just relaxing is when I might get a great idea. Or stumble across a fabulous resource. Or see a pithy quote I want to save for later. When relaxing, I’m usually reading a book, browsing around on my iPhone, doodling on my iPad, or watching a TV show or movie....

 · Laura Lis Scott
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Six notebooks compared: Leuchtturm1917, Rhodia, Midori, MUJI, Northbooks and Moleskine [updated]

A while ago, I got interested in bullet journaling. Eager to get going on it quickly and discover how I would use this freeform style of journaling and personal planning, I initially went with the popular bujo favorite, the Leuchtturm1917. But I was immediately frustrated when I saw how much ghosting I had on the reverse sides of my pages. I needed to find the best bujo notebook. Bullet journaling, at least in my mind, demands a higher standard....

 · Laura Lis Scott
an old doorbell, with magnets on the left, and a big bell with striker on the right

Bother me less (or: I don't want your notification's nose under my attention tent)

The Apple Watch seems to be inspiring a lot of uninspired thinking. Things like all the news that fits on the wrist. I for one cannot imagine why I would spend hundreds of dollars so a device can annoy me with yet more notifications. I certainly don’t need to have my work/flow/conversation/meeting/meditation/relaxation interrupted with news about people I don’t know in places I’m not. That crap can wait until I’m ready to lean back and browse the headlines....

 · Laura Lis Scott
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On ergonomic keyboards again

Following up on my review of three ergonomic keyboards last year, I pass along now Marco Arment’s review of the Matias Ergo Pro Keyboard, which he’s liking. From the features he describes, it sounds similar to the The Goldtouch Go!2 keyboard I’ve been using, but with some differences, including one that would drive me crazy. [T]he Ergo Pro’s two halves are physically separate and connected by a cable. This is a mixed bag: it provides flexibility, but it’s also frustrating to have no way to lock in your preferred setting, leaving you to figure it out again whenever it’s moved....

 · Laura Lis Scott
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Digital: ephemeral

What happens to this blog when I die, when I no longer pay the monthly bill? What happens to my emails when my card no longer covers the autopay on the account?

 · Laura Lis Scott
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Scrivener to Word

Note (26 Feb 2018): This post was written some years ago about Scrivener 2. It does not apply to Scrivener 3, which has happily addressed these gripes. This shouldn’t be so hard. I’ve reached the point where it’s time to compile my manuscript from Scrivener into Word format, in preparation for The Great Editing. Now, the Compile part is easy. (Well, I say “easy” in that it’s pretty complicated, but in a Scrivener way, and after you’ve been using Scrivener for a while, well, you eventually become something akin to a taxi driver in London; you eventually learn where those dead-ends and obscure addresses are....

 · Laura Lis Scott
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The pain and suffering of Scrivener exports to Word

Note (26 Feb 2018): This post was written some years ago about Scrivener 2. It does not apply to Scrivener 3. As a writing tool, I love Scrivener. Unfortunately this comes with some hindrances: Scrivener is not a standard format, so you have to compile and export anything you do to to anything with it. Microsoft Word is a standard format in publishing—obviously people in publishing are a bunch of masochists—but Scrivener’s exports to Word are unstyled....

 · Laura Lis Scott
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Second screen (because the first screen is inadequate)

It’s not that we need a second screen, it’s that we have an inadequate first screen. If we’re watching a great movie, we’re engrossed, swept away. We’re not even thinking about the phone in the pocket or purse. We’re not wondering what’s happening on Facebook or Pinterest. We’re not even thinking about that. That’s the point, isn’t it?

 · Laura Lis Scott
Desktop with laptop, keyboard, open notebook filled with printed pages, and an additional monitor

K is for Keyboard

Regular keyboards give me a pain — a pain in the wrist, specifically. It makes a huge difference when you’re typing a lot for emails, blog posts, proposals, articles … and novels. In the ’90s, I used an ergonomic Microsoft keyboard, but by today’s standards, it was a mushy experience. I couldn’t just adapt that old thing. I needed to find a modern solution. So I tried three different ergonomic keyboards....

 · Laura Lis Scott